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Information for Volunteers

Read this section for useful information that will enable you to make the correct decisions, ask the right questions, and ensure you have the best experience possible!

Fundraising News ?

Celine Smyth from UK hosts a festival as a fundraiser for ISV The Meath Chronicle
Published: Wednesday, 9th June, 2010 4:59pm

Music, song and comedy in the cowsheds at Causey

Causey Farm in Fordstown is host this Sunday, 12th June, to Farmfest, a boutique music and comedy festival. Four stages host a huge variety of acts, with comedians, céilí, choir, trad session and live bands performing around the farm. Fire twirlers, a gourmet BBQ, a traditional Irish tea party, and culchie games stalls will all contribute to the festival atmosphere. All funds go to Kitovu Hospital, Uganda, and community projects in Equador, where local girls Celine Smyth and Una Murtagh will volunteer this year.

Celine, a student teacher, will travel to Equador this summer with International Student Volunteers, and will work in a number of community projects there that aim to improve quality of life for many of the local people. Uña worked as a paediatric doctor for six months in Kitovu Hospital in Uganda last year, and will return there again this June with a team of people to renovate the hospital's Nutrition Unit.

The hospital is constantly under pressure to provide services and medicine to the sick children and often have four children to a bed. Many die from malaria and malnutrition, diseases which are preventable and treatable here in Ireland. Two of her friends, Ciara McNamee and Sabrina Callan organized a 40 feet container to be sent to this hospital. The container carried 16,000 items of clothing (mainly donated by people from Meath) and vital medical equipment. The container is now en route to Uganda, and is due to arrive in June.

*Please note that as of November 2014, ISV’s procedures have changed and donations made to ISV on behalf of a specific participant are not classified as tax-deductible. As these fundraising articles were written prior to this change, they may contain references to tax-deductible donations made towards a specific participant’s program.

Travel Program Blends Fun with Philanthropy ?

The Poly Post, California State Polytechnic University, Pomona – March 30, 2010

Lyrissa Roman plans to spread her Cal Poly charm by participating in a four-week summer volunteer and travel program in Thailand. “I just wanted to go all out and do something I’ve never done before,” said Roman, a fifth-year public relations student.

Along with 15 to 20 other youth volunteers, Roman will work under the supervision of California-based International Student Volunteers, a nonprofit organization geared toward college students.

ISV programs combine conservation, community development and other volunteer projects with travel opportunities in eight countries.

Roman said she is excited to help those in need while exploring an exotic land with other young people.

“I like that I get to volunteer but also enjoy the country,” said Roman. “I think it’s going to be a great culture to learn about.”

ISV programs offer hands-on activities to improve local environments. The organization partners with Habitat for Humanity and Conservation International, among others. Along with volunteer projects, participants are provided with tours and free time to enjoy the country they are helping.

Lyndy Roman, a first-year nutrition student, said she was proud of her sister's determination and desire to help those less fortunate.

"I think it's cool that she gets to go to Thailand for an entire month," said Lyndy. "She's working really hard for it."

Roman said the experience will be a complete shock because she will be traveling solo and will not know her living situation until 30 days before her Aug. 19 departure date.

"I've never traveled without anyone I know, especially without my parents," said Roman. "But I'm super excited about all the different things I'll experience."

Despite having limited travel experience, Roman said her volunteering history has prepared her for working abroad. Roman has worked in event planning and fund-raising to aid at-risk orphans. "We helped raise about $10,000 and 100 percent went to charity," said Roman. "The kids don't have parents or many things but we made their lives a little happier for awhile."

Although her financial situation requires a boost, Roman said she will put her fund-raising experience to use and make enough money to cover the trip. With a supportive family and friends network, she is confident the money will come.

"So far I've gotten two donations," said Roman. "The rest of my family has been working on getting more donations."

Maria Roman said she admired her daughter's initiative.

"I'm very proud of her," said Maria. "She's being responsible and finding her own way to fund the trip and not relying on just me and her dad."

Roman tapped into her creative side by using technology and a sense of humor for a unique fund-raising activity. With a few friends and a video camera, Roman recorded herself performing challenges for donations to her trip fund.

Her first challenge was to perform three basketball shots in under a minute, despite her lack of sports expertise. Roman scored a monetary donation along with the baskets.

"For the next video, I'll probably eat really weird things or embarrass myself in public," said Roman. Roman is accepting donations to cover the remaining balance.

Contact Roman at lnroman@gmail.com or visit her blog at http://lifetimeadventure.tumblr.com for details.

*Please note that as of November 2014, ISV’s procedures have changed and donations made to ISV on behalf of a specific participant are not classified as tax-deductible. As these fundraising articles were written prior to this change, they may contain references to tax-deductible donations made towards a specific participant’s program.

Cal Poly Student Seeks to Make a Difference in Thailand ?

By Articles From Everywhere About Chino Hills and Chino

April 1, 2010 Cal Poly Student Seeks to Make a Difference in Thailand Chino Hills resident, Lyrissa Roman, will be traveling to Thailand this summer to volunteer in a local Thai community.

Pomona, CA March 16, 2010 - Lyrissa Roman, 22, living in Chino Hills, has been selected to participate in a unique four-week volunteer program in Thailand, working alongside 20 to 50 other like-minded individuals from around the world. Roman will be working under the direction of the non-profit organization, International Student Volunteers (ISV). Her departure date to Thailand will be August 19.

Roman's first two weeks in Thailand will consist of volunteering opportunities. ISV will inform her 30 days before departure of volunteer projects. Available projects include community development and conservation. Community development projects range from teaching children English, building schools and playgrounds, working with children at risk from child labor smuggling, and developing eco-tourism initiatives in regional communities. Conservation projects consists of rehabilitating exotic gibbons and monkeys who have been rescued from the illegal wildlife smuggling trade, working in an elephant nature park, and scientific research in forests and jungles.

Each two-week volunteer projects is dedicated to making a difference in the lives of Thai people who are facing poverty and the environment surrounding them. A series of conservation and sustainable development issues have been created by the rapid development of Thailand, and the nation's inability to house its growing population and support its economic growth.

Rural Thai communities are in need of developmental assistance with regard to sanitation and infrastructure development to handle the increases in population. Thailand also faces increased pressures caused by the influx of refugees from Burma. At the same time, Thailand's people and government have recognized the urgent need to support, protect and conserve Thailand's natural resources, particularly its wildlife. Much help is needed in this area.

As an ISV volunteer, there are a variety of opportunities to go deeper than being a tourist; volunteers help conservation and community development efforts in a strategic way. ISV partners with a number of local non-government organizations, orphanages and other grassroots groups to work on meaningful projects. Many students report back that their lives have also been changed while seeking to make a difference in the environments they volunteer in. Following her two weeks of volunteering, Roman will participate in an educational two-week adventure tour of Thailand. Roman will explore some of the country's most exciting locations such as the cultural capital of Chang Mai, sea kayaking the hidden caves of Koh Hong, an overnight hike through secluded hill-tribes and learning to cook in a Thai cooking school. Through this adventure, Roman will gain a deeper appreciation and greater sense of stewardship for the natural wonders of Thailand.

"I am so excited to volunteer with International Student Volunteers in Thailand," says Roman. "The people of Thailand have such a vibrant culture and wonderful way of life, and I hope I can make a difference to the children and those who need help - its sounds like a once in a lifetime experience!" Roman will be paying for a portion of the Program with her personal funds and currently looking for donations from family and the community.

"I currently work for a catering company in Orange County on the weekends and with my parents' help I have a portion of the Program cost covered." Roman will be contributing to ISV's two millionth hour of volunteer work that will be accomplished this summer 2010. ISV has offered life-changing volunteer projects since 2002. Over 4,000 students travel with ISV every year across 6 continents.

About Lyrissa Roman Lyrissa Roman is 22 years old and lives in Chino Hills, CA. She attends Cal Poly Pomona full time majoring in Communications with an option in Public Relations. She currently interns for a film financing and producing company in Santa Monica and works as a server for a catering company in Orange County. She has been involved with various school activities, such as helping to raise funds for the Orange County Asian Pacific Islander Community Alliance, Discovery Arts, and Aid to Children Without Parents' Saving Children in Crisis Program, which aimed to combat child trafficking in Asia. She has been a member of Pua'ikeana Hawai'i Club and Asian Pacific Student Association at Chapman University and the Public Relations Student Society of America at CPP.

About ISV ISV focuses on sustainability and eco-conscious tourism. One of ISV's main goals is to create an opportunity for students to experience a "once-in-a-lifetime" adventure where they can meet new people, discover new places and travel with a purpose that benefits both the host country and the student. Volunteer projects are operated in partnership with well-established conservation organizations including government and non-government organizations (NGOs), private reserves and farms, and local grassroots community groups. All ISV volunteers have the opportunity to become a part of local communities that have partnered with

ISV to develop hands-on volunteer projects and many have enjoyed lasting friendships as a result. If you would like to sponsor Lyrissa Roman by making a donation on her behalf please contact her at lnroman@gmail.com or 909.438.3899.

If you would like to find out more information about International Student Volunteers and even perhaps join Roman, please visit their website www.isvolunteers.org. She has also started a blog for people to follow before heading out to Thailand. http://lifetimeadventure.tumblr.com

*Please note that as of November 2014, ISV’s procedures have changed and donations made to ISV on behalf of a specific participant are not classified as tax-deductible. As these fundraising articles were written prior to this change, they may contain references to tax-deductible donations made towards a specific participant’s program.

Local Northern Michigan University student seeks to make a difference in Ecuador ?

Upper Michigans Source.com - Tuesday, August 24, 2010

LOCAL NORTHERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY STUDENT SEEKS TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN ECUADOR

Richard Chiamulera, a local student from Northern Michigan University, will be traveling to Ecuador this summer to volunteer to assist underprivileged communities. Richard Chiamulera has been selected to participate in a unique four-week volunteer program in Ecuador, working alongside 20 to 50 other like-minded individuals from around the world. Chiamulera will be working under the direction of the non-profit organization, International Student Volunteers (ISV).During his first two weeks in Ecuador, Chiamulera will be volunteering on a diverse range of community development projects run in conjunction with a local Ecuadorian community. Projects include building schools for local Quichua Indian tribes, developing sustainable organic agriculture initiatives, teaching English and sports to local children, developing alternate tourism models and building community gardens and educational murals for children. Each two-week volunteer project is dedicated to making a sustainable difference and supporting initiatives by communities as they try to increase environmental sustainability, economic growth and community education.

Many students report back that their lives have also been changed while seeking to make a difference in the communities they volunteer in.Straddling the equator, Ecuador is considered one of the top 10 mega-diverse hot spots on the planet and is home to 15% of the world’s known bird species. Ecuador is claimed as a UNESCO World Heritage site, and is comprised of Amazonian rainforests, mangrove forests, arid coastlands, cloud forests, alpine grasslands and the Galapagos Islands.

Ecuador's geographical and biological diversity are matched by its mosaic of cultures, including 14 indigenous tribes. Due to western development, much of Ecuador’s unique species and habitats are facing extinction and many of Ecuador’s native tribes are losing their traditional land and way of life. Approximately 40% of Ecuador’s population lives below the poverty line. Through this experience, Chiamulera will gain a deeper appreciation and greater understanding of the festive culture of Ecuadorian people.Following his two weeks of volunteering, Chiamulera will participate in an educational two-week adventure tour of Ecuador. During these two weeks, he will travel extensively throughout the country and be fully immersed in the local Ecuadorian culture.

Chiamulera will explore some of the country’s most exciting locations such as glacier climbing on the 19,000 ft. Cotopaxi Volcano and discovering cultural attractions such as Quito (Ecuador’s capital city), and the world famous Otavalo indigenous market. “I am excited to make a difference in a community that needs my help,” says Chiamulera. “ISV has some incredible projects working with children and I am so excited to learn more about a culture that is so different from mine!”Chiamulera will be paying for the majority of the Program with his personal funds. “I will be putting my tips earned in working at Hudson’s Classic Grill of Marquette towards this trip.”Chiamulera will be contributing to ISV’s two millionth hour of volunteer work that will be accomplished this summer 2010. ISV has offered life-changing volunteer projects since 2002. Over 4,000 students travel with ISV every year across 6 continents.

ISV focuses on sustainability and eco-conscious tourism. One of ISV’s main goals is to create an opportunity for students to experience an “once-in-a-lifetime” adventure where they can meet new people, discover new places and travel with a purpose that benefits both the host country and the student.Volunteer projects are operated in partnership with well-established conservation organizations including government and non government organizations (NGOs), private reserves and farms, and local grassroots community groups.

All ISV volunteers have the opportunity to become a part of local communities that have partnered with ISV to develop hands-on volunteer projects and many have enjoyed lasting friendships as a result.

If you would like to sponsor Chiamulera by making a donation on his behalf please contact him at rchiamul@nmu.edu or (317) 441-9474.

If you would like to find out more information about International Student Volunteers and even perhaps join Chiamulera, please visit their website www.isvolunteers.org.

*Please note that as of November 2014, ISV’s procedures have changed and donations made to ISV on behalf of a specific participant are not classified as tax-deductible. As these fundraising articles were written prior to this change, they may contain references to tax-deductible donations made towards a specific participant’s program.

University student knitting toques for Thailand ?

kv style, CANADAEAST.COM - February 5th, 2010

University student knitting toques for Thailand Fundraising needed to take care of animals at rescue centres

Erin Moir is busy knitting Toques for Thailand.

The 21-year-old Rothesay woman is fundraising for a one-month relief mission this summer to help conserve wildlife in Thailand.

"I think it's a really good cause," Moir said. "I know there are a lot of countries that are having problems right now but Thailand has always had a really rich environment and it's getting taken down by tourism." Moir said in Thailand there are many wildlife rescue centres that house animals such as elephants, monkeys and leopards. She said their enclosures are being torn down and they are not being fed properly.

“People don’t know how to treat the animals,” Moir said. “Part of our project is to educate the tourists and visitors about how they can help to conserve the environment.”

Moir said her group will be building animal enclosures and fencing, cleaning proper space so the animals have room to run around and play, feeding them nutritious meals and researching the local environment. The 21-year-old is studying biology and psychology at the University of New Brunswick Saint John and will complete her undergraduate degree in May. She will leave for Thailand in June and hopes to attend an education program when she returns so she can become a high school biology teacher.

“I think it would be a good experience to go into another culture,” Moir said. “I think it’s really going to open up my eyes. I have never been outside of North America and I think it’s going to be a big culture shock but in a good way. It will make me pay attention to what is going on outside of Canada and the United States.”

She said she was thinking about doing a volunteer mission this summer and the International Student Volunteers did a presentation at her school. She said the group takes volunteers from all over North America and Europe to do missions in countries across the globe.

Moir immediately applied and was accepted.

She said her program will cost $3,600 and the flight is $1,000. She is planning to raise as much of the money as she can.

Moir said she recently knitted a toque for herself and during a conversation with her mother she decided to sell knitted toques to raise money with the slogan Toques for Thailand. She is also selling tickets on an afternoon sailing trip that will include a barbeque lunch and is hoping to organize a one-kilometer fun run when the weather warms up.

Moir can be reached at 849-2348.

*Please note that as of November 2014, ISV’s procedures have changed and donations made to ISV on behalf of a specific participant are not classified as tax-deductible. As these fundraising articles were written prior to this change, they may contain references to tax-deductible donations made towards a specific participant’s program.

Greensborough girl needs help to lend a hand ?

Diamond Valley Leader - 8 NOV 2010

STUDENT nurse Katherine Doyle is heading to South Africa to help the needy, but she needs your assistance. The 19-year-old Greensborough woman needs $5000, before she travels to Johannesburg and Wild Coast on November 20, to buy home-building materials and other resources for impoverished communities.

“Eventually I want to go overseas and nurse in areas that are poverty-stricken,” the University of Ballarat student said. “I’m doing everything I can to fulfil my goal.”

Ms Doyle had already raised $1500 from chocolate sales and a barbecue. Ms Doyle had her first taste of philanthropy when she visited a Cambodian orphanage for limb amputees in high school. As well as building homes in poverty-stricken areas as part of International Student Volunteers, she will be helping construct playgrounds for children, improve sanitation and teach at local schools.

If you would like to support Ms Doyle’s efforts by making a donation, contact her on Katherinedoyle@live.com.au or 0409 427 418.

*Please note that as of November 2014, ISV’s procedures have changed and donations made to ISV on behalf of a specific participant are not classified as tax-deductible. As these fundraising articles were written prior to this change, they may contain references to tax-deductible donations made towards a specific participant’s program.

CSUN students to travel, volunteer in Costa Rica next summer ?

Katie Donahue, Daily Sundial - November 08, 2010

Two CSUN students will spend part of their summer on a volunteer program in Costa Rica. Sandra Lomenick and Ruby Chu will participate in the four-week International Student Volunteers (ISV) program beginning in June.

The ISV has been operating volunteer programs since the early 1980s, said Simon Costain, international marketing director for ISV. “Our mission statement is to create an environment conducive to combining education, conservation, and recreation into the most incredible experience of a lifetime while giving back to the countries in which we are traveling,” he said. The first two weeks of the program are spent volunteering, while the second half of the program is devoted to an adventure tour of the country. Activities may include snorkeling and white water rafting, Costain said.

The combination of volunteer work and adventure is what led Lomenick, 23, to apply to the program. “It was the best of both worlds,” she said. If it had been volunteer or adventure alone, she would not have been as drawn to the program, she said. Both Lomenick and Chu are going to Costa Rica a week early to participate in a Spanish immersion program. “You live with the host family so you can practice conversational Spanish,” Lomenick said. Lomenick, a senior child and adolescent development major, wanted to participate in a program that would allow her to closely work with people in the community. “I’m hoping to be able to assist in schools,” she said.

The element of community is also what attracted Chu, a junior child and adolescent development major, to the Costa Rica program. “I was interested in working with kids and doing more community work rather than working with animals or water,” she said. At one point, Chu considered a career as an educator, she said. “Maybe through this experience I’ll want to become a teacher,” said Chu, 20.

Both students said they are looking forward to experiencing a different culture. Lomenick, who is originally from Chattanooga, Tennessee, said she has only been to Canada and Mexico. “I’m looking forward to going out of my comfort zone,” she said. “I wanted to do something on my own and for myself.” Her move from a small town in Tennessee to California broadened her awareness of the world, she said. “There’s so much more than what I knew,” she said. Chu, a Los Angeles native, has previously traveled to Korea and Canada but is looking forward to learning how people live in Costa Rica, she said.

She initially wanted to study abroad while at CSUN but was not able to participate because those programs are two semesters and it did not fit with her schedule, she said. Chu went to an ISV presentation on campus and decided to apply.

“I was just fascinated that you get to volunteer and help the community by building homes and painting schools,” she said. Lomenick has decided to spend an extra week in Peru on her own and go on a trek to Machu Picchu after the ISV program concludes.

“It’s kinda like my big hoorah before I go into the career world,” she said. Both students are currently trying to raise money to help meet the cost of the trip. “It’s hard to know where to start,” Lomenick said of the fundraising process. The program requires volunteers to complete a minimum of 80 hours of volunteer work, she said. “We’re not just going to be having fun, we’re going to be working too,” Lomenick said. She added the cost of the program itself is $3,395 without airfare.

The Spanish immersion program is extra. She is trying to raise money through babysitting and has already begun to save for the program, she said. Chu is planning on sending letters to her friends and to companies in efforts to raise money. “If I didn’t get one donation it would still be worth it,” Lomenick said.

*Please note that as of November 2014, ISV’s procedures have changed and donations made to ISV on behalf of a specific participant are not classified as tax-deductible. As these fundraising articles were written prior to this change, they may contain references to tax-deductible donations made towards a specific participant’s program.

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